Dirty Parts Dual Battery Kit Unpacked

Dirty Parts Shipping Box

Dirty Parts Shipping Box

This is my order form Dirty Parts in California. I photograph the box and packaging mostly for others assurance ordering online. Packaging is important so that the product doesn't get damaged in transit.

This is a Dual Battery Kit for my 2007 Toyota 4Runner.

Dirty Parts Packing Materials

Dirty Parts Packing Materials

Continuing from the last photo, the internal packaging is good. Dirty Parts used a couple of those hardening foam packing bags. They go in the box soft and shape to the parts being shipped and then they harden so the parts don't get damaged with the shipping box takes a hit during transit.

Dirty Parts Unpacking Box

Dirty Parts Unpacking Box

Here's what you see inside the box when you remove the packing bag from the top. All the small components are sealed in plastic baggies so they don't get lost and are protected from the elements. I appreciate that. I've had some companies throw loose washers in a box which of course slide out during transit.

Dirty Parts Order Parts

Dirty Parts Order Parts

Alright here's everything that was in the box for my 2007 Toyota 4Runner Dual Battery Kit. All the small parts were inside the white box you see in the lower left.

Dirty Parts Dual Battery Kit Unpacked

Dirty Parts Dual Battery Kit Unpacked

Opening up the instructions baggy, I found a CD of photos, a sticker and a few photocopied photos I suppose for the non-computer people out there.

Engine Bay Passenger Side Near Firewall

Engine Bay Passenger Side Near Firewall

This is the back corner of my engine bay in my 2007 Toyota 4Runner, otherwise known as passenger side firewall. You can see there is a little room here, not a lot, but some room. This is where the second battery will (hopefully) end up when I'm done. I have some concerns about the largest black ducting/tube thing coming from the firewall, I'm hoping it will be ok.

Test Fitting the Dual Battery Tray

Test Fitting the Dual Battery Tray

Here I'm test fitting the dual battery tray from Dirty Parts in my 2007 Toyota 4Runner. Its really going to be a tight fit, but a few others on the internet have reported success with this Dual Battery Kit in my make/model of 4Runner. My 4Runner is a V8 which means the air filter is the larger boxier one compared to the smaller conical one on a V6. That leaves a little less room for this second battery.

Getting Ready for Dual Battery Tray

Getting Ready for Dual Battery Tray

In the V8 4Runners there is not a lot of room for a dual battery, but it can be done without any modifications to the OEM components in the engine bay.

To give yourself some more room to work, follow these preparation steps:

  • Remove Ground Wire on passenger side of engine bay coming from lid of air filter box
  • Press small plastic tab on wiring harness support bracket on passenger side of firewall to release the wire loom and give you some wiggling room.
  • Loosen Cold Air Intake Box hose clamp, popup the air intake hose off, open 4 snap clamps around air filter box, pop off air filter box lid and air filter. Set aside as shown.
  • In my case the existing threaded nut insert for the battery tray's mounting tab was full of gunk. I sprayed a bit of WD40 in there, waited a few minutes, then poked out the dirt with a small poking tool. Later I would also put WD40 on the new bolt that goes here to minimize binding and allow it to thread in nicely.

Mount Z Bracket for Dual Battery Tray

Mount Z Bracket for Dual Battery Tray

The Z Bracket is party of what makes this 4Runner Dual Battery Kit nice to install. It takes advantage of two pre-existing "dimples" on the fender well for the mounting bolts. Then it provides a nice support and bolt holes for mounting the tray on top of.

There is nothing different about this part from the included instructions for mounting in an FJ Cruiser.

Dryfit Battery Tray in 4Runner Engine Bay

Dryfit Battery Tray in 4Runner Engine Bay

At this point you can "dryfit" your battery tray. You don't need to tighten down superwell. The goal here is to make sure the Z Bracket is well positioned when the 3rd bolt is added at the front of the battery tray into the existing M6 threaded hole in the fenderwell. Ideally the Z Bracket will have been tightened down good enough to hold, but loose enough that you can adjust the positioning with a little light pushing on the battery tray to line it up.

If the bolt heads will grip well enough you may be able to tighten up the bottom bolts of the Z Bracket at this point.

You also want to drill a small pilot hole in the fender well in the center of the last open bolt hole on the battery tray which is in the inside corner of the tray itself. Once your pilot hole has been drilled you can remove the battery tray, taking care to leave the position of the Z-Bracket unmoved.

If you weren't able to tighten down the Z-bracket before, now is the time to do it as you have access to the bolt heads.

Drill Out Pilot Hole

Drill Out Pilot Hole

Now that you have removed the battery tray, you can drill out the pilot hole using the 5/16" drill bit as indicated in the instructions.

Also while the battery tray is out, this is when you want to attach the solenoid onto the battery tray using two of the provided washers and nylok nuts.

Finish Mounting the Dual Battery Tray

Finish Mounting the Dual Battery Tray

Now replace the battery tray into its position with the solenoid now attached to its side. I found it best to get the back onto the Z Bracket first, tighten those two bolts, then add the front bolt in the mounting tab, and last the bolt in the corner of the battery tray. The reason is that the nuts on the back will tighten up best without any tension anywhere.

The hole in the corner of the battery tray was sitting a little high off the fender well, so in addition to the provided fender washer, I added a nother couple washers in there to make it as level as I could make it. I then ran one of the provided bolts through the top of the tray, through my washers with a fender washer against the vehicle fenderwell, then underneath a smaller washer and the nylok nut. Once all four bolts/nuts have been tightened down, the tray becomes very well attached.

Replace Airbox Lid and Ground Wire

Replace Airbox Lid and Ground Wire

Now that the tray is mounted, you can replace any pieces you moved for better working room. That means put your air filter back in, and the air intake box lid back on. Close the four snap clips you opened to remove it. Put the air intake hose back onto the lid and tighten the hose clamp that holds it there. Re-attach that ground wire on the passenger side of the engine bay.

I didn't have my new battery yet when I installed the tray, so I wanted everything back to normal so I could drive it for the next couple days before I get the new Optima Yellow Top that will go here.

Battery Tray Installation Done

Battery Tray Installation Done

This is just an "end of day" shot to show what it looks like now that the battery tray is mounted. This will hopefully give a good idea to other V8 4Runner owners how perfectly it fits between the airbox and the wire loom on the rear firewall. I was quite skeptical before I bought this kit that it would actually fit. Thanks to the power of the internet, I found someone else who did this already and let me know it would fit even with the V8 engine.

Secondary Battery in Place, Ready for Wiring

Secondary Battery in Place, Ready for Wiring

You can see the Odyssey PC1500 Group 34/78 Battery in Place, ready for wiring into my 2007 Toyota 4Runner dual battery system from Dirty Parts.

Note: The clearance between the hood's pneumatic lift/shock and the battery is close. But it does fit! I slowly closed the good while watching carefully and there is no interference. However, when you are mounting the battery tray I would push it as far towards the engine as the existing screw holes allow (there might be 1/16" slop in the screws/holes before tightening them down).

Closeup of Dirty Parts Battery Tray vs V8 Toyota 4Runner Airbox

Closeup of Dirty Parts Battery Tray vs V8 Toyota 4Runner Airbox

This is a closeup of one of the key concerns when installing this dual battery kit from Dirty Parts in a V8 edition of a 4th Gen Toyota 4Runner. The airbox on the V8 is considerably larger than the air intake (cone filter) on an FJ Cruiser or V6 4Runner.

The clearance is close, but as you can see fits just fine. I received a tip from a fellow 4Runner owner to throw some black rubber hose over the tie down bolt to protect the neighboring airbox a bit.

Note: The Odyssey PC1500 Group 34/78 Battery is slightly narrower than the battery tray from Dirty Parts which leaves an extra 3/16" or so on the front and back to fit these hold downs. I don't know if that is the same case with the Optima Yellow Tops or not.

Extending the Ground Wire on the Passenger Side of the Engine Bay

Extending the Ground Wire on the Passenger Side of the Engine Bay

There is a ground wire running from the wiring harness over the air intake to the passender side of the engine bay. It naturally went diagonally straight accross the area where the battery fits. Not a big problem, but in the way of easily placing/removing the battery.

Jeremy Smith at Battery Direct (www.batterydirect.com) helped me do this in the parking lot when I purchased the battery. Didn't charge me for his time or the small shop supplies to splice in that 6" of ground wire. They also gave me the best price any Canadian vendor was able to quote and had it in stock for immediate pickup. Awesome service, highly recommended if you need a battery in Canada.

Note: Yes, the heat shrink splices still needs a zap from the heat gun. Don't worry... like I said we did it in the parking lot. I'll shrink them up asap at home.